Assigned Duties – 911 Police Aid Foundation http://911policeaidfoundation.org/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 06:06:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://911policeaidfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Assigned Duties – 911 Police Aid Foundation http://911policeaidfoundation.org/ 32 32 San Jose Planning Policy Manager – San Jose, CA, US | Works https://911policeaidfoundation.org/san-jose-planning-policy-manager-san-jose-ca-us-works/ https://911policeaidfoundation.org/san-jose-planning-policy-manager-san-jose-ca-us-works/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 06:06:30 +0000 https://911policeaidfoundation.org/san-jose-planning-policy-manager-san-jose-ca-us-works/ SPUR Employer: San José, California, United StatesSite: Tue 19 Oct 21Posted on: Full timeType: About SPUR SPUR is a nonprofit public policy organization in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through research, education and advocacy, SPUR strives to create an equitable, sustainable and prosperous region where everyone thrives. We bring together people from all political backgrounds […]]]>

SPUR

Employer:

San José, California, United StatesSite:

Tue 19 Oct 21Posted on:

Full timeType:

About SPUR

SPUR is a nonprofit public policy organization in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through research, education and advocacy, SPUR strives to create an equitable, sustainable and prosperous region where everyone thrives. We bring together people from all political backgrounds to develop solutions to the big problems facing cities. With offices in San Francisco, San José and Oakland, we are recognized and respected for our independent and holistic approach to urban issues.

The opportunity

SPUR is seeking candidates for the newly created position of San José Planning Policy Manager. SPUR believes in the power of good planning to create vibrant and equitable cities and communities, and strives to make neighborhoods safe and welcoming for all. The San José Planning Policy Director leads SPUR’s work on planning in San José. This role is an opportunity to lead important work in one of the most influential public policy organizations in the Bay Area and San José.

This role is perfect for someone with a deep knowledge of the public policy process in San José and a passion for helping San José become a more prosperous, sustainable and equitable city. Applicants must have professional training in town planning, land use planning, landscape architecture and / or urban design. This position reports to the Director of Urban Planning Policy.

Core Responsibilities

This role includes important policy research, writing and analysis, as well as strategic thinking, effective advocacy, community engagement and coalition building. This role involves meaningful collaboration with internal and external stakeholders to develop political ideas and strategy and to effect policy change in San José. This role requires excellent project management skills, experience in engaging with funders and the general public. This role also serves as an ambassador to local government staff, elected officials, business and community leaders, and staff of other civic organizations.

The San José Planning Policy Officer will help lead SPUR’s work on projects such as the Guadalupe River Park and Guadalupe River Park Gardens focus in the future of downtown San José. , a 15-minute fair district plan for San José, a vision for the Coleman corridor neighborhood, the future of the Diridon station area and downtown west, a plan to keep the promise of urban villages , a community plan for a Reid-Hillview serving the community, and much more.

Key qualifications

  • The candidate should have experience in drafting, advocating and carrying out policy changes in the area of ​​community planning.
  • The candidate should be well versed in the major community planning policy issues affecting American cities today. Knowledge of San José issues and institutions is highly desirable.
  • The candidate must have professional training in town planning, land use planning, landscape architecture and / or urban design. Technical design skills would be preferred.
  • The candidate should be a seasoned writer and researcher, able to make complex policy issues interesting and understandable to a general audience.
  • The candidate should have experience in promoting policy change.
  • The position requires strong meeting facilitation skills and the ability to work well with people from all sectors of the community and build diverse coalitions and consensus to achieve political results.
  • The candidate must have experience in the effective management of projects.
  • The candidate should have experience in seeking funding for their work.
  • The candidate should have both high emotional intelligence and relationship management skills as well as strong quantitative reasoning skills and an ability to interpret and explain data, quantitative methods, trends and summary numbers.
  • Either a master’s degree in public policy, urban planning or a related field, or a minimum of five years of equivalent experience is preferred.
  • Verbal fluency or advanced fluency in Spanish is a plus.

We are looking for someone who has a background in Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and / or has a demonstrated ability to work across differences. The candidate must be committed to diversity, equity and inclusion, and demonstrate this commitment in their policy, facilitation, advocacy and management responsibilities.

Compensation

The salary range for this position is $ 75,000 to $ 100,000 and will be based on experience and commensurate with skills and qualifications. This is a full time exempt position. SPUR offers a generous and comprehensive benefit package.

How to register

Please submit a cover letter and curriculum vitae. Applicants must apply before submitting their documents to this link.

Equal Opportunity Employer

SPUR is an employer guaranteeing equal opportunities with a strong organizational commitment respecting differences of all kinds. SPUR prohibits unlawful discrimination against any employee or candidate for employment based on race, color, religion, sex, gender identity, age, sexual orientation, political orientation or disability or any other basis prohibited by law. With this in mind, we strongly encourage applications from people of color, people with disabilities, women, LGBT applicants and others who will contribute to the diversity of our staff.

Disabled applicants

Reasonable accommodations will be made so that qualified applicants with disabilities can participate in the application process. Please advise in writing of any special requirements at the time of request.

The following statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work performed by the employees assigned to this position. They are not intended to be interpreted as an exhaustive list of all the responsibilities, tasks and skills required of the personnel so assigned.




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Details released on arrest of deceased woman at Webb County Jail https://911policeaidfoundation.org/details-released-on-arrest-of-deceased-woman-at-webb-county-jail/ https://911policeaidfoundation.org/details-released-on-arrest-of-deceased-woman-at-webb-county-jail/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 21:05:47 +0000 https://911policeaidfoundation.org/details-released-on-arrest-of-deceased-woman-at-webb-county-jail/ New details have emerged regarding the arrest of an inmate who died last weekend at the Webb County Jail. Laredo Police said officers found Ashley Nicole Castro, 30, in possession of Xanax and black tar heroin. Authorities also discovered that she was wanted for having escaped court for drug possession. Castro’s arrest records revealed multiple […]]]>

New details have emerged regarding the arrest of an inmate who died last weekend at the Webb County Jail.

Laredo Police said officers found Ashley Nicole Castro, 30, in possession of Xanax and black tar heroin. Authorities also discovered that she was wanted for having escaped court for drug possession.

Castro’s arrest records revealed multiple arrests, the majority of which were for burglary, theft and drug possession.

His arrest took place around 1 p.m. on October 3, when officers investigating a robbery behind At Home on 5000 San Dario Ave. spotted two men and a woman sleeping under a trailer near the loading docks. The woman has been identified as Castro.

Police checked the trio’s records and discovered Castro was wanted from the Webb County Sheriff’s Office for ignoring court on possession of a controlled substance charge.

Castro was served with the warrant active. Officers then noticed that she had a purse when they first saw her sleeping under the trailer. When asked if it was her purse, Castro said it was and that she had syringes inside her purse. She then allegedly authorized officers to search her purse.

“Ashley gave us her consent to search the inside of her purse. Ashley informed us that she had (a) a controlled substance in her purse. I saw two syringes inside Ashley’s purse when I opened it, ”the officer wrote on the affidavit.

The officer then discovered two plastic bags in the central pocket of the purse. One plastic bag contained eight Xanax pills while the other contained less than a gram of black tar heroin. She was then taken to prison.

Correctional officers reportedly found her unconscious on October 9 at approximately 5:26 am Staff at the Webb County Medical Examiner’s Office declared her dead at 5:39 am.

The sheriff’s office said Castro refused the dangerous drug rehab treatment offered to him by prison medical staff.

“We encourage all inmates who take drugs (to) take detox drugs from dangerous drugs, but unfortunately we cannot force them,” Sheriff Martin Cuellar said in a previous statement. “They have the right to refuse treatment.”

A review of surveillance video and logbook information revealed that correctional officers assigned to the position were performing their duties in accordance with the Texas Commission on Jail Standards, authorities said.

Sheriff officials have contacted Texas Rangers to conduct a separate investigation for transparency. The case remains open.

Castro’s family members have opened a GoFundMe account to help with funeral expenses. Those wishing to donate can visit gofund.me/459b8066.


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Cadillac City Council Considering Purchase of New Type of Restraint for Police Officers | New https://911policeaidfoundation.org/cadillac-city-council-considering-purchase-of-new-type-of-restraint-for-police-officers-new/ https://911policeaidfoundation.org/cadillac-city-council-considering-purchase-of-new-type-of-restraint-for-police-officers-new/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://911policeaidfoundation.org/cadillac-city-council-considering-purchase-of-new-type-of-restraint-for-police-officers-new/ CADILLAC – Cadillac city council is expected to discuss on Monday purchasing a state-of-the-art restraint system for officers that will give them another tool to apprehend suspects in a way that minimizes the use of force . According to council documents, the police department has researched a new less-than-lethal tool called BolaWrap and is seeking […]]]>

CADILLAC – Cadillac city council is expected to discuss on Monday purchasing a state-of-the-art restraint system for officers that will give them another tool to apprehend suspects in a way that minimizes the use of force .

According to council documents, the police department has researched a new less-than-lethal tool called BolaWrap and is seeking approval for the acquisition of 13 units.

The units will be assigned to four sergeants, eight patrollers and a school resources manager.

“The system uses small hooks around a cord which, when deployed, wraps around the ends,” the board’s document says. “The hooks are designed to prevent minor puncture injuries, and the packaging ensures that the ends cannot be moved, but the person still has the option of protecting themselves in the event of a fall. More importantly, the use of this type of system falls much lower on the force use continuum and is classified in the same way as restraint with handcuffs. The main objective of deploying this system would be to prevent events from escalating to the point where a higher level of force is required. “

The other advantages of using the BolaWrap are as follows: they do not work by inflicting pain on the suspect; they can be used on subjects for which other strength options may not be adequate or appropriate (ie, elderly, mentally ill); and there is a larger area to target for deployment – the entire leg area (optimal from the knees down) as well as the arms (optimal from the elbows down).

The cost for 13 units is $ 16,272.50 and acquisition is only available through a regional distributor, Vance’s Law Enforcement. Staff recommended that the board forgo the tenders due to the fact that Vance’s Law enforcement is the only source available to acquire the units.

Funds for the purchase are available in the general fund.

Also on Monday, the board is expected to consider a recommendation to purchase a new HVAC system for the building used by the Michigan Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy.

The city owns the office building located at 120 W. Chapin St. which is currently leased to EGLE under a lease that runs until 2037.

See Cadillac Council on A3

Cadi This building is now over 25 years old and the mechanical systems need to be improved, according to council documents. The control system is outdated and parts are difficult if not impossible to find for repairs. The cooling system experienced regular and catastrophic failures throughout the summer of 2021.

City staff consulted with a mechanical engineering firm to perform a systems analysis and recommended a plan to replace these systems.

Offers were recently posted for this project and the recommendation from mechanical engineering firm, Nealis Engineering, is to award the offer to the lowest bidder, Top Notch Heating, Cooling and Geothermal for $ 257,800.

Staff also recommended that a 10% contingency be allowed for the project in the event of unexpected changes in the scope of the project.

Funds for this project are available in the building authority’s operating fund.

The Council will also hold a public hearing on Monday on a proposed transfer of ownership in the industrial park to Cadillac Renewable Energy.

In 1994, the city and the Cadillac Local Development Finance Authority entered into an agreement with Beaver Michigan Associates Limited Partnership to supply the company with water from a well located on property in Harry Vanderjagt Industrial Park.

When the deal expires on October 31, it was stipulated that the city and LDFA could transfer ownership of the well to Beaver, which is now Cadillac Renewable Energy.

Cadillac city manager Marcus Peccia told council last month that staff had considered the option of transferring ownership of the well to Cadillac Renewable Energy and believed it would benefit the city.

The town currently has one employee who works five hours a week maintaining the well. By transferring ownership, Cadillac Renewable Energy would perform this maintenance itself and the municipal employee would be free to perform other duties.

Additionally, Peccia said the transfer of the well would also benefit the city as it is able to charge Cadillac Renewable Energy per 100 cubic feet of water; under the current arrangement developed in the 1990s, the company pays a fraction of what other users pay.

Cadillac City Council meets Monday at 6 p.m. at the Cadillac Municipal Complex, located at 200 North Lake Street.


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Monica Walk of Fond du Lac County Council resigns due to attendance rule https://911policeaidfoundation.org/monica-walk-of-fond-du-lac-county-council-resigns-due-to-attendance-rule/ https://911policeaidfoundation.org/monica-walk-of-fond-du-lac-county-council-resigns-due-to-attendance-rule/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 21:25:19 +0000 https://911policeaidfoundation.org/monica-walk-of-fond-du-lac-county-council-resigns-due-to-attendance-rule/ FOND DU LAC – Monica Walk, a member of the Fond du Lac County Board of Directors, has resigned, citing health reasons and the requirement to attend council meetings in person. In her resignation letter, dated Tuesday, Walk said she had done “deeply detailed and thoughtful committee work” via virtual online participation, but supervisors do […]]]>

FOND DU LAC – Monica Walk, a member of the Fond du Lac County Board of Directors, has resigned, citing health reasons and the requirement to attend council meetings in person.

In her resignation letter, dated Tuesday, Walk said she had done “deeply detailed and thoughtful committee work” via virtual online participation, but supervisors do not have the same option for full board meetings. county administration board since the county’s COVID-19 emergency rules ended in May.

“Although the county council leadership approved the ability of supervisors to attend committee meetings through participation in the virtual platform, it did not support the same participation in the virtual platform for monthly county council meetings, ”Walk wrote. “I cannot in good conscience fulfill only half of the duties assigned to my elected position. Therefore, I am resigning my position as District 25 Supervisor.”


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Texas Rangers record missing in police murder investigations https://911policeaidfoundation.org/texas-rangers-record-missing-in-police-murder-investigations/ https://911policeaidfoundation.org/texas-rangers-record-missing-in-police-murder-investigations/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 03:13:18 +0000 https://911policeaidfoundation.org/texas-rangers-record-missing-in-police-murder-investigations/ By Michael LaForgia and Jennifer Valentino-DeVries NYTimes News Service When the Texas Rangers learned that a woman had died in a jail south of Dallas, they put Adam Russell on the case. He discovered that there had been a fight between the woman, Kelli Leanne Page, 46, who was detained on drug trafficking charges, and […]]]>

By Michael LaForgia and Jennifer Valentino-DeVries

NYTimes News Service

When the Texas Rangers learned that a woman had died in a jail south of Dallas, they put Adam Russell on the case.

He discovered that there had been a fight between the woman, Kelli Leanne Page, 46, who was detained on drug trafficking charges, and two guards, who entered her cell because they said she was not would not stop banging a hairbrush on the door.

A jailer threw her to the ground, punched her in the face as they scuffled, and piled on top of her as blood dripped from her nose. The other, an intern weighing 390 pounds, immobilized her until she stopped breathing.

Six hours into his investigation, Russell indicated in his notes that he was not inclined to blame the guards for his death. And when an autopsy later determined that Page was the victim of homicide – who died on October 8, 2017, of a form of asphyxiation – Russell appeared not to reconsider his decision.

Instead, he got a second opinion from a retired chief medical examiner, who read the forensic report and said he believed heart disease could have resulted in his death while she was immobilized. Russell later said that the initial autopsy was a rushed judgment and that “something inside Kelli” had killed her. The guards have not been charged.

For many years, Texas has made its state investigators, the legendary Rangers, available to investigate deaths in the custody of local authorities. At least seven other states have taken a similar approach, believing that outside investigations are more likely to hold perpetrators to account.

But state agents don’t necessarily lead to better investigations or greater accountability, according to a review of the New York Times case in Texas. Drawing on dozens of interviews and over 6,000 pages of investigative records, autopsy reports, police records and court documents, The Times found that state investigations can be affected. by the same pro-police shortcuts and prejudices that outside interventions are supposed to eliminate.

Some of the Rangers’ investigations provide a classic example of hard police work, such as the one into the overdose death of James Dean Davis, 42, in the La Salle County Jail in 2017. Ranger Randy Garcia has meticulously documented the neglect of the guards who laughed at Davis. as he shouted for help from the floor of his cell, questioning more than a dozen witnesses and reviewing video footage and audio recordings – and securing charges against two jailers for tampering with government documents.

In other cases, the Rangers failed to meet basic standards. They did not speak to all relevant witnesses, delegated investigative tasks to the agencies examined, and did not follow up on any signs that officers were negligent or behaving dangerously.

The Times has identified 29 cases the Rangers have investigated since 2015 in which a person stopped breathing after struggling with local authorities. None of these investigations led prosecutors to indict anyone in law enforcement. In two-thirds of the cases, The Times found shortcuts, missteps or judgment calls that some veteran homicide detectives said could indicate lack of effort on the part of the Rangers.

Rangers who handled the various cases refused or did not respond to requests for interviews, and the Rangers’ parent agency, the Department of Public Security, made no official available to answer questions.

It is a reality of police in Texas and elsewhere that people sometimes die in custody, through no fault of the officers who arrested them. When officers cross the line, investigators play an important role in holding them accountable. But cases are often given lower priority than other tasks because of the general reluctance of law enforcement officials to blame their own.

“I guarantee you this is not a wanted mission for the Texas Rangers,” said Adam Bercovici, a former homicide lieutenant with the Los Angeles Police Department.

A patchwork approach

Over the past decade, hotbeds of police violence across the country have drawn attention not only to aggressive tactics and racial disparities in law enforcement, but also to the disparate way in which dating is studied.

Some states, like California, have rarely sent their officers to review deaths in custody, leaving those investigations to local police and sheriff’s departments. In 2014, Wisconsin became the first state to require independent inquiries into deaths involving police officers.

Pressure to demand independent reviews has increased since the murder of George Floyd last year by a Minneapolis police officer. At least seven states have adopted measures requiring local agencies to forward inquiries into deaths in custody to state officials or other external investigators.

“Let’s face it – if you’re from the same organization you’re going to have a certain degree of bias no matter how objective you try to be,” said Ashley Heiberger, a former police officer from Bethlehem, Pa., Who advises departments on the use of force.

The 29 deaths examined by The Times occurred across Texas. In at least 16 of the cases, the Rangers did not interview everyone who witnessed the encounter. They sometimes relied instead on written statements or video footage, and in at least five investigations they did not interview any witnesses.

The Times found 12 cases in which the Rangers delayed their visit to the scene or did not visit it. Delbert McNiel, 48, who had a history of mental illness, died in a scuffle with police officers in Hamlin after they overpowered him and then shocked him 11 times with a stun gun in December 2017. The Ranger assigned to the case went to the hospital, photographed the body and conducted six brief interviews with the officers and paramedics involved. But his report did not reflect any interviews with other witnesses or a visit to the convenience store outside of which McNiel died.

Rob Bub, a 33-year Los Angeles Police Department veteran who now works as an investigation consultant, said failure to examine the place of death was usually a sign of a “lazy investigation.”

In three cases the Times examined, Rangers gave important jobs to employees of agencies under investigation.

After the death of Robert Geron Miller, 38, following a brief stint in Tarrant County Jail in July 2019, Ranger CH McDonald learned he had had a violent brawl with his jailers. Miller suffered head injuries when one of them threw him to the ground, and he complained of chest pain after another guard knocked him out with pepper spray. He was dragged face down to a cell where another jailer saw him sprawled on the floor, splashing the toilet water on his face. Twelve minutes later, the Ranger noted, Miller stopped breathing.

McDonald described conducting four brief interviews in his case and left the task of viewing video footage to a detective from the county sheriff’s office – the agency responsible for the prison – who said he saw no “suspicious behavior. or criminal “. “The Ranger closed the case about nine months later, upon learning that the medical examiner had ruled Miller’s death was caused by a sickle cell attack.

A lack of specialists

Texas employs about 165 Rangers statewide – the Houston Police Department, by comparison, has 5,300 sworn officers – and most Rangers work as generalists.

But training guidelines and technical best practices cannot take into account all the situations an investigator will face, and sometimes judgment must be used that can affect the outcome. This was the case with the death of Michael Garrett in Comal County in 2019.

As police arrested 18-year-old Garrett for drug possession in December, an officer suspected he had swallowed methamphetamine. Instead of putting Garrett in an ambulance, according to records, he took him to the county jail, where guards attempted to strip search him. When Garrett resisted, they forced him to use a restraint and left him outside the prison control room. Shortly after, a guard noticed that Garrett had turned purple and he was taken to the hospital.

Medical tests revealed methamphetamine in his system and he was on life support when the prison contacted the district attorney’s office, which issued an affidavit stating that Garrett would not be charged. The prison was then able to release him from detention and bend the rules to report the episode as a death in custody.


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Kenya: police on site after controversial “tax collection” operation https://911policeaidfoundation.org/kenya-police-on-site-after-controversial-tax-collection-operation/ https://911policeaidfoundation.org/kenya-police-on-site-after-controversial-tax-collection-operation/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 08:45:25 +0000 https://911policeaidfoundation.org/kenya-police-on-site-after-controversial-tax-collection-operation/ A police attempt to justify a controversial tax collection operation inside Pension Towers in Nairobi on Friday was condemned on Saturday for disregarding the facts and the law. National Police spokesman Bruno Shioso angered Kenyans by explaining what happened in an incident in which activist Boniface Mwangi ran into a group of at least four […]]]>

A police attempt to justify a controversial tax collection operation inside Pension Towers in Nairobi on Friday was condemned on Saturday for disregarding the facts and the law.

National Police spokesman Bruno Shioso angered Kenyans by explaining what happened in an incident in which activist Boniface Mwangi ran into a group of at least four “Tax officers” accompanied by a police officer who described himself as an executor. Mr Mwangi later said the group was visiting construction companies door-to-door – apparently to collect back taxes.

The group claimed to be from the Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA), but Mr Mwangi, who was filming as he hired them, demanded that they produce their ID before they could enter a barbershop where he found.

None have.

It was the start of dramatic events that saw more armed officers arrive on the scene, angered by the fact that Mr. Mwangi was recording the proceedings. The immediate request was that Mr. Mwangi stop recording the scene, which he refused.

Mr. Shioso’s version of events is that the police in the video had been legally tasked with enforcing revenue collection by Nairobi Metropolitan Services and the KRA.

“Some defaulters had already been arrested when the activist in question – who is said to have an office in the building – accosted police and KRA agents, challenging them to identify themselves,” the statement read. Mr. Shioso.

“The activist in question persisted in his ‘identification’ argument while the police were fully dressed in their official uniforms and armed with official weapons,” he added.

Injury of the activist

The police spokesman went on to say that an injury suffered by Mr. Mwangi, and the images of which the activist shared on social media, was not inflicted by the police but by himself when he “fell to the ground to cause a commotion which was supposed to aid the escape of the arrested defaulters.”

Oddly, however, the KRA did not support the actions of those who claimed to be in authority and refused to identify themselves as requested by Mr. Mwangi.

“Please note that all KRA personnel on duty must always provide identification before entering your premises,” the authority said in a tweet Friday evening.

Mr Shioso’s statement that the police were wearing an official uniform (they also did not identify themselves) also opposed a remark that the Inspector General of Police, Mr Hilary Mutyambai, made in April. when interacting online with Kenyans.

He wrote: “Police officers were trained in the self-identification procedure while on duty. It is mandatory for all police officers to identify themselves as stipulated in the Police Procedure Code.

These contradictions, along with the extension of other facts captured in Mr. Shioso’s video, have sparked criticism and lectures from Kenyans online.

“Please relieve Bruno of his duties. Either he does not have the professional know-how of official communication, or he is just another rogue officer in your premises,” Kibet posted, tagging the inspector general.

“The current level of information of Kenyans cannot be afforded by this type of communication. It breeds more mistrust and ultimately contempt!”

Living up to the facts